Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Feldmarschallin: I even have a recording of that Trovatore from Wien. 3:34 AM
  • Porgy Amor: I am not sure if Chiara was “the” Aida in the 80s, but she was certainly a famous one, and I saw... 3:23 AM
  • Feldmarschallin: I didn’t say you cannot expect them at all but under THESE circumstances. Two repetory... 3:13 AM
  • Krunoslav: Ja, these tiresome provincials at the ends of the civilized Earth can scarcely expect Important... 2:12 AM
  • zinka: https://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=f_Iu SMPoHM4 What would life be without coloratura fan???? 1:48 AM
  • Feldmarschallin: Two single performances isolated and that in the middle of the harsh winter in America and... 1:34 AM
  • vilbastarda: Yes, I was there, and felt the same: completely entrapped from the very first note. She is an... 12:46 AM
  • Camille: Oh dear, now I am really sorry I didn’t attend. 11:17 PM
  • Camille: Yes sir, WELL worth your time. It may require some diligence in digging up a libretto which is, I... 11:13 PM
  • Belfagor: Yes, she held us from the very first notes of the ‘Mort d’Ophelie 217;. Interesting... 11:11 PM

C’est la guerre, mais ce n’est pas magnifique

“If war is hell, then Soldier Songs should rank somewhere around ‘purgatory.’ David T. Little’s hourlong opera, which made its NYC debut Sunday, takes a serious and exciting idea—the experiences of ordinary soldiers before, during and after combat—and reduces it to a mishmash of verbal and musical clichés.” [New York Post]

2 comments

  • Henry Holland says:

    But neither text nor music has anything remotely interesting to communicate about the experience of war — not even “what is it good for?”

    Hahahaha, I’m sure the ghosts of Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong would approve of that sentence.

  • killthewabbit says:

    Glad to see you got this one squarely in the crosshairs. At least one of the other local critics seems to be too busy exchanging high fives with the composer and company on Facebook to issue sound judgement.