Cher Public

  • armerjacquino: For Runyan’s birthday- the most beautiful version of ‘I’ll Know’ I’ve ever heard (at 8:36)... 8:11 AM
  • thenoctambulist: Yeah that was why I was so confused about that statement. Thank god I was right. 5:56 AM
  • thenoctambulist: I hope this is an open thread. I keep reading about veiled contralto sound, especially in descriptions about bel canto... 5:54 AM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: That’s so sweet of you Camille. I really would like to meet you someday. I hope someone posts the video of the... 3:52 AM
  • overstimmelated: P.S. In any case, it would be interesting to know why Maestro Luisi withdrew from the original production. Something... 3:16 AM
  • antikitschychick: Oy vey the break in that extremely long paragraph about SY was a fail; perhaps La Cieca can kindly assist and edit it... 3:09 AM
  • overstimmelated: But what if an irreconcilable disagreement arose in rehearsals over the placement of the prompter’s box (as in last... 3:02 AM
  • antikitschychick: (short) addendum: I forgot to mention that the second disappointment was that the chorus during the Misere sounded... 2:26 AM

C’est la guerre, mais ce n’est pas magnifique

“If war is hell, then Soldier Songs should rank somewhere around ‘purgatory.’ David T. Little’s hourlong opera, which made its NYC debut Sunday, takes a serious and exciting idea—the experiences of ordinary soldiers before, during and after combat—and reduces it to a mishmash of verbal and musical clichés.” [New York Post]


  • Henry Holland says:

    But neither text nor music has anything remotely interesting to communicate about the experience of war — not even “what is it good for?”

    Hahahaha, I’m sure the ghosts of Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong would approve of that sentence.

  • killthewabbit says:

    Glad to see you got this one squarely in the crosshairs. At least one of the other local critics seems to be too busy exchanging high fives with the composer and company on Facebook to issue sound judgement.