Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • m. croche: The fairly strict, unvarying meter does indeed create a distancing effect – a big step away... 2:48 AM
  • zinka: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=2SZs xTBCzoA ATTENZIONE!!!! Today Anna and Piotr called La Cieca and... 2:18 AM
  • La Cieca: I may be wrong about this as I have no Hungarian at all, but the use of this meter with its... 2:10 AM
  • zinka: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=mn0T fE1Hewc O must be losing it!!! Here I am thinking of... 1:57 AM
  • Bill: Marika Oszvald – sorry for incorrect spelling above. I met her a couple of years ago after a... 12:18 AM
  • Satisfied: Missed the “relevant thread.” And even if so, does it really matter that it was... 12:09 AM
  • Bill: It looks to be Marika Osvold – a legendary Soubrette in Budapest (she was always doing... 11:57 PM
  • m. croche: Ah, well you see the meter of Hiawatha and Bluebeard all have their roots in the ancient... 11:40 PM
  • NPW-Paris: He could have added “strapping&# 8221;. 11:39 PM
  • La Cieca: Now at last you see before you Bluebeard’s Castle. Not a gay place like your father’s. Where all... 11:29 PM

C’est la guerre, mais ce n’est pas magnifique

“If war is hell, then Soldier Songs should rank somewhere around ‘purgatory.’ David T. Little’s hourlong opera, which made its NYC debut Sunday, takes a serious and exciting idea—the experiences of ordinary soldiers before, during and after combat—and reduces it to a mishmash of verbal and musical clichés.” [New York Post]

2 comments

  • Henry Holland says:

    But neither text nor music has anything remotely interesting to communicate about the experience of war — not even “what is it good for?”

    Hahahaha, I’m sure the ghosts of Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong would approve of that sentence.

  • killthewabbit says:

    Glad to see you got this one squarely in the crosshairs. At least one of the other local critics seems to be too busy exchanging high fives with the composer and company on Facebook to issue sound judgement.