Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

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Whose regie? Our regie!

Oh, those Alps (“Loved her, hated him!”) have done it again, or at least for the first time. SF Guy correctly reasoned from those familiar peaks that the opera in question in last week’s Regie quiz was La Wally. This very chic production was devised by Guy Joosten for the Theater St Gallen, and for those curious about Aufführungspraxis of the Catalani repertoire, La Cieca offers a video trailer of the show immediately following the jump.

And now, cher public, your challenge for the first week of November.

28 comments

  • brunettino says:

    Un Ballo in Maschera

    1. Ulrica and Riccardo at Ulrica’s, with crowd
    2. Amelia and Riccardo at the Gallow’s Place
    3. The Ball: conspirators and masked guests

  • spiderman says:

    Macbeth!?
    Just because the Lady opens her Voice ins malvolent way! ;-)

    or maybe Elisabetta Regina al Castello di Kentilworth!

  • rysanekfreak says:

    La Traviata.

    1. The Brindisi.
    2. Alfredo’s aria opening Act Two.
    3. Alfredo and Giorgio Germont together at the end of Flora’s party. The big concertato.

  • tannengrin says:

    For sale -- democracy….two guys hugging…. that looks like Don Carlos to me. The Wall Street version.

    1 -- this could be Elisabetta and Philip in the garden, but she seems way too happy.
    2 -- Philip and Elisabetta after their big Act 4 scene
    3 -- Don Carlos & Posa, brothers in arms @ Occupy Flanders

  • David says:

    I have a terrible fear that we are going to be seeing a lot of ‘occupy’ chic on stage -- both operatic and straight. The merest hint of a disgruntled chorus or Shakespearean peasant revolt and out will come the tents.

    Oh, and Meistersinger clearly

    • luvtennis says:

      At first I thought Don Carlos because of the masks. And the signs. Then I thought Meistersinger because of the juxtaposition of the characters. But what about the signs and the masks. How could they relate to Meistersingers?

  • MonkeyBoy says:

    Tosca because of the aeriel type view in the second picture.

  • A. Poggia Turra says:

    Clearly, this is the Spike Lee production of Verdi’s beloved Luisa Miller:

    Photo One: The Duchess Frederika puts the glom on Rodolfo

    Photo Two: “Abrani, o perfido”

    Photo Three: Count Waldner -- Wurm Duet

  • Perles75 says:

    Don Carlo as tannengrin says seems indeed to be a good guess, but I would say

    1) Fontainebleau scene between Carlo and Elisabetta before they know she will be married to Filippo. Is he showing to her his portrait perhaps?

    2) Fontainebleau act, AFTER Carlo and Elisabetta discover she will marry Filippo. The lights of the palace of Fontainebleau in the background.

    3) obviously, Posa & Carlo duet.

  • bryanchip says:

    This is [redacted]. I confess I am cheating. I read a review of a Wall Street/OWS production of [redacted] done somewhere in Europe--it looks a lot more interesting than the pile of rubble the Met calls a production.

  • Avantialouie says:

    This is clearly Weill’s “Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny.” 1: the “Duet of the Cranes,” or, perhaps, “Is here no telephone?” 2: Jenny rolls on the floor to tempt Jimmy with the “Alabama Song; 3: the residents of Mahagonny sing of the city’s one unforgivable crime: not being able to pay one’s way.