Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • manou: http://tinyurl.com /pyvvmrh 11:18 AM
  • manou: If it was years ago it might be this: At the early recordings the engineers were so frightened by the... 11:14 AM
  • Fluffy-net: I thought the poppies were great and loved every one. 11:14 AM
  • NPW-Paris: Sounds like a good subject for a competition. 10:46 AM
  • NPW-Paris: Myrtò Papatanasiu was excellent when I heard her – but that was as Sifare in Mitridate, re... 10:45 AM
  • operaassport: Improvident spending? Poppies? You can’t possibly be serious. Salaries and benefits are... 10:35 AM
  • La Cieca: How about the more than 2/3 of the Met budget that goes for salaries and compensation? Would you... 10:29 AM
  • DonCarloFanatic: I am considering a gift right now, although it won’t be a significant one. None of... 10:23 AM
  • Avantialouie: If YOU were considering a major donation to the Metropolitan Opera, wouldn’t you be very... 10:04 AM
  • manou: Rehearsals only involve certain performers at certain times – there might be a possibility of... 9:46 AM

An unknown object draws us

Could there possibly be any more providential day of the year for New York City Opera to announce their Annual Fall Vintage Event?

38 comments

  • Quanto Painy Fakor says:

    For those of you who never saw him and for the rest of us who will never forget him

    • Benedetta Funghi-Trifolati says:

      Grazie. I always thought he could do more with one slightly-raised eyebrow or pinky finger than other singers/actors could with their entire bodies. Saw him as Scarpia, Iago, Falstaff and the Count in NOZZE. As Scarpia he managed to draw magnetic attention even while “dead” and lying on the floor with those glazed-over, open, staring-directly-at-the-audience-fish-eyes. To say nothing of the still menacing from the afterlife sound (which echoed and reverberated through the entire theatre) when he let his fist fall to the floor after Tosca retrieved the salvacondotto from his deathly grip. Maestro!