Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • messa di voce: Thanks for the beak! 9:16 PM
  • La Cieca: Well, he was drinking the blood of human sacrifices on the Grand Tier all that time, so a little... 9:15 PM
  • Porgy Amor: Maybe I’m just being dense or uninformed here about the way these transitions work, but... 8:47 PM
  • bluecabochon: Messa, I just posts it, I don’t have to prove anything that someone else writes about,... 8:46 PM
  • Indiana Loiterer III: Surprised nobody mentioned Fledermaus or Merry Widow, considering how often we’ve... 8:46 PM
  • La Cieca: Gosh, it’s a good thing that all fourth-hand anonymous gossip issuing from people who... 8:45 PM
  • The_Kid: i am sorry, but this is beyond ridiculous. someone should sue that guy. does Gelb also have his... 8:27 PM
  • messa di voce: Please give an example of a new production with “more expensive and detailed... 8:26 PM
  • bluecabochon: Here’s a beak. :> Why not? It could have been home office bookcases. I’m sure... 8:25 PM
  • The_Kid: Ooh yes I forgot all about ‘The Silent Woman’… ;.now I want to do a list: Aida:... 8:24 PM

An unknown object draws us

Could there possibly be any more providential day of the year for New York City Opera to announce their Annual Fall Vintage Event?

38 comments

  • Quanto Painy Fakor says:

    For those of you who never saw him and for the rest of us who will never forget him

    • Benedetta Funghi-Trifolati says:

      Grazie. I always thought he could do more with one slightly-raised eyebrow or pinky finger than other singers/actors could with their entire bodies. Saw him as Scarpia, Iago, Falstaff and the Count in NOZZE. As Scarpia he managed to draw magnetic attention even while “dead” and lying on the floor with those glazed-over, open, staring-directly-at-the-audience-fish-eyes. To say nothing of the still menacing from the afterlife sound (which echoed and reverberated through the entire theatre) when he let his fist fall to the floor after Tosca retrieved the salvacondotto from his deathly grip. Maestro!