Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Milady DeWinter: Understood, ilpenedel, and thank you; I should have said that “some” can at... 12:52 PM
  • Clita del Toro: I didn’t want to discus Studer’s appearance when I saw the photo, but…to... 12:44 PM
  • Dabrowski: I actually agree with OAS that Battle suffered (and, I would imagine, still suffers) from pretty... 12:43 PM
  • Feldmarschallin: Well that outfit is quite something. Did she just clean her house? And the hair? Here... 12:37 PM
  • kashania: After her dismissal from the Met, she’s done nothing but concert (and recital) work. 12:26 PM
  • operainsider: Well I would normally agree about hollywoods problem casting women and minorities but Lupita... 12:03 PM
  • Cicciabella: So DG’s using the same photos as in her Verdi album booklet. Beautiful pictures, but it... 11:52 AM
  • La marquise de Merteuil: Operaasport – thanks for your opinion which has shed alot of light on La... 11:40 AM
  • Grane: If that’s the one that was televised, I remember thinking Pavarotti looked like a cadaver next... 11:38 AM
  • quoth the maven: The pun? Oh that’s right, she’s black! And you said “whitewashed .”... 11:36 AM

How monarchic was my sprezzatura!

“Yet the evening’s first words, heard in the set-piece Ombra ma fui—like all of Xerxes’ arias sung with monarchic sprezzatura and amoral relish by Stella Doufexis—came unexpectedly in Italian. It was flagrant violation of this house’s fundamental principle, here brushed aside by the cultural capital of the aria and deemed insufficient to sunder the inextricable bonds between the Italian text and Handel’s melody. It was as if the composer and his music, through his advocate Herheim, was holding ground at least at the outset against appropriation of his music by the moderns.”

Oh, what’s not to like in a review like this one?

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