Cher Public

  • Camille: O! What eagle eyes you have to have swooped down on that one, MastroKruno! NO, am not referring to “Cruising 221;,... 4:06 PM
  • Camille: If there is anyone still considering going upstate to see this Iris, may I offer these two suggestions: listen first to the... 3:39 PM
  • Krunoslav: ” In fact, Mr McKinney’s singing; of which I’ve just heard the fist act” Oh, is it THAT kind of production? Any... 3:12 PM
  • Camille: Jungfer Because a girl’s duenna comes first, I am disobeying the edict to be die schweigsame Frau: (Monsieur Camille is... 2:06 PM
  • Camille: I read a part of TT’s book report summary and do not recall him even mentioning the excellent Kundry. In fact, Mr... 1:58 PM
  • Camille: Bluecabachon– ;I left and then you came in and now you left? So I’m leaving as there is nothing to talk about this... 1:45 PM
  • PCally: The Karajan has Rysanek and Ludwig. Nilsson didn’t add the opera to her rep until the mid-1970s, by which time... 1:11 PM
  • Camille: Following the 1841 Schott republished score of Der Fliegende Holländer, which was the author’s original libretto and which... 1:09 PM

How monarchic was my sprezzatura!

“Yet the evening’s first words, heard in the set-piece Ombra ma fui—like all of Xerxes’ arias sung with monarchic sprezzatura and amoral relish by Stella Doufexis—came unexpectedly in Italian. It was flagrant violation of this house’s fundamental principle, here brushed aside by the cultural capital of the aria and deemed insufficient to sunder the inextricable bonds between the Italian text and Handel’s melody. It was as if the composer and his music, through his advocate Herheim, was holding ground at least at the outset against appropriation of his music by the moderns.”

Oh, what’s not to like in a review like this one?

18 comments