Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • bronzino: It’s the ‘M’ word, isn’t it? ‘Marketing&# 8217;. Gasp. And yet. Can... 1:13 AM
  • La Cieca: Among opera composers, I don’t think anyone much consciously wrote “for the... 11:30 PM
  • La Cieca: Nonsense. Everyone knows Daniels is a daddy. 11:19 PM
  • irontongue: The only Meyerbeer staging of the last century except for L’Africaine in 1900, 1901, 1907,... 11:14 PM
  • Poison Ivy: Godfrey: Do you mind telling me just what a scavenger hunt is? Irene: Well, a scavenger hunt is... 10:24 PM
  • phillyof: Bronzino ( and all ): Naturally, I asked about the revisions to the work post-Santa Fe, but... 10:20 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: You have no idea who my favorites are and you are definitely not among them. 10:15 PM
  • Indiana Loiterer III: As to your last question: topicality is big these days in all the arts and has been... 10:12 PM
  • Poison Ivy: And I suppose your favorite Andrea Bocelli demonstrates mastery of technical matters, resonance,... 10:08 PM
  • Indiana Loiterer III: …or perhaps a case of miscasting. LP seems to be a lyric-coloratura, and... 10:04 PM

How monarchic was my sprezzatura!

“Yet the evening’s first words, heard in the set-piece Ombra ma fui—like all of Xerxes’ arias sung with monarchic sprezzatura and amoral relish by Stella Doufexis—came unexpectedly in Italian. It was flagrant violation of this house’s fundamental principle, here brushed aside by the cultural capital of the aria and deemed insufficient to sunder the inextricable bonds between the Italian text and Handel’s melody. It was as if the composer and his music, through his advocate Herheim, was holding ground at least at the outset against appropriation of his music by the moderns.”

Oh, what’s not to like in a review like this one?

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