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Mouth feel

“The bass-baritone Luca Pisaroni, playing Leporello in the Met’s recent Don Giovanni, asked for vegetable sausage, said James Blumenfeld, the Met property master. ‘It was the most disgusting thing I ever smelled,’ Mr. Blumenfeld said. He added that the bass-baritone James Morris is known for preferring bananas when he is playing Scarpia in the fatal meal scene of Verdi’s Tosca.” [New York Times] (Photo: Ken Howard)

20 comments

  • Pisaroni loves dogs (especially dachshunds) and is a vegetarian: too bad he is already married…

    • ianw2 says:

      His dogs, Lenny and Tristan, seem to have their own youtube channel. Lenny is adorable. I suppose Tristan is alright, but I don’t like small dogs.

  • Quanto Painy Fakor says:

    All the news that’s fit to print. Godis skum!

  • Ilka Saro says:

    Hans Peter Koenig was chowing down on chicken wings during Act I of Walkuere. He courteously put one on Siegmund’s plate, but Siegmund never stops talking about himself long enough to eat anything.

  • Buster says:

    This has been corrected now, but really.

  • operaassport says:

    How much more phallic could this get?

  • bluecabochon says:

    I read that article yesterday. Lots of fun. I would hate to have to be the food prop man!

  • Camille says:

    M croche told us just last night, in the first act silence of “Silent Night” that those vegetable sausages are made from Pencil Shavings!
    Chacun à son gooooooooo.

  • tannengrin says:

    I myself can never tell the Italians apart. They all sound the same!

  • Erdgeist says:

    I feel like a bubble has burst. Sitting where I usually sit (where I can barely make out the singers, let alone their mouths), I always assumed the food was an inedible prop and the eating was make-believe since it would interfere with the singing. (Wouldn’t it?)

    • Ilka Saro says:

      You are right that eating onstage is notoriously problematic, and not just for opera singers, but for actors as well. The physical act of eating can be very involving and distracting. AND you are right that it might interfere with the singing. And some performers simply will not do it. That is why I was so surprised to see Hunding enjoying his chicken wings on Monday night. Many singers, including our James Morris, like bananas slices because they are very easy to eat, and rather innocuous to the throat and to digestion.

      • Sempre liberal says:

        So Luca Pisaroni’s sausage is disgusting-smelling?
        I would have imagined it to be thick and savory.

        James Morris prefers to eat bananas that are easy to eat and rather innocuous to the throat? I guess that’s what happens when your vibrato is so wide.

        One learns so much on this site.

        • brooklynpunk says:

          Sempre:

          “So Luca Pisaroni’s sausage is disgusting-smelling?”

          Maybe that is the reason he and Mrs.P only have dogs,,,?--lol!

  • Lalala says:

    From the video, you can see that it mostly is a prop—but there is a very small section of the cake that is real and the “kids” grab that morsel to eat before the huge feasting begins (on real food) in the final scene in the witch’s kitchen. I remember there being publicity at the time this production was new at the Met. I guess there was a some house of culinary that went all out for the production--there may have even have been a contest amongst pastry chefs. Details are hazy in my mind. It’s been awhile.