Cher Public

  • JohninSeattle: I agree with everyone about the Grand Inquisitor scene… it was awful in every way imaginable. Chicagoing I believe... 12:06 PM
  • jackoh: I guess that what sparks outrage in each of us differs among us. 11:39 AM
  • DonCarloFanatic: Sorry to hear that. The Grand Inquisitor’s terrifying appearance despite his blindness is the most riveting moment... 11:19 AM
  • gustave of montreal: If I were to attend La Juive a story in the old city of Konstanz, and find the singers in modern dress with coats... 10:35 AM
  • chicagoing: The manner in which the Grand Inquisitor’s blindness was handled, a dramatic choice about which I believe there is no... 10:24 AM
  • The Poet Lenski: Opolais withdrew from the production. No explanation was given. 10:10 AM
  • Krunoslav: “Josef von Manowarda” Among the most savage and regular denouncers of fellow artists as Jews, Communists and... 9:42 AM
  • Krunoslav: I thouGHt Silvestrelli was DREADFUL- top and bottom splayed, ugly heavy vibrato throughout, zero gravitas. He looked like... 9:39 AM

Fairy-lit

It was dear Oscar Wilde, wasn’t it, who devised that early mot du jour “Good writers borrow; great writers steal,” an aphorism that has since been borrowed by many. La Cieca will leave it up to the reader to decide whether the Handa Opera on Sydney Harbour production of La traviata ranks as a “good” or a “great” example of idea appropriation; meanwhile she will just sit back and marvel at Francesca Zambello‘s idea that setting Verdi’s opera on an comically oversized silver tea tray beneath an even more comically oversized chandelier might be considered “art” anywhere in the civilized world. (So shiny!)

Photo by Lisa Tomasetti

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