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“Then, with financial assistance provided by the United Negro College Fund, Bess got a degree in medical transcription…”

“Instead of Bess’s leaving their Charleston ghetto for New York by herself, with the crippled Porgy giving chase some time later, the Broadway version would include a newly invented scene in which Bess tries to persuade Porgy to start a new life with her up North. She leaves, followed by Porgy; one final stage picture that was considered had the two looking at each other at a distance. The intent was to indicate that Porgy and Bess would be reunited.” [New York Times]

150 comments

  • arepo says:

    Oh my!
    I was trying to say that not unlike an Orthodox Jew who takes the most devout and ritualistic of the religion to its heart, so does Wilson have the same kind of feeling about his belief of the origin of the Black credo. A pride of what the Black person was back then — not shame like some indicate it to be.

    If you don’t understand what I am saying and you feel you need to challenge it further, I will have failed to make you understand what I meant and we shall simply have to drop it right there. It won’t get any clearer.
    Hope this does it.

    • brooklynpunk says:

      Arepo:

      Sorry if i mis-understood..or ruffled ypur feathers..but, you MUST ADMIT that was an odd analogy to print, without any explanation , at first- AND- as a Jew..my feelings towards my Orthodox “brothers” is generally fairly negative….

      Still…not very clear..SORRY ‘BOUT THAT….

  • kennedet says:

    I have had the good fortune of singing in one of the many productions of P&B over the years (Chorus and small role).

    Personally, P&B could be updated if it is studied scrupulously by a competent director, hopefully with a musical background and a thorough understanding of the novella and also,quite frankly, shortened. This could possibly ease the feeelings of African-Americans and others who find the 1930′s stereotype too painful to accept. However, through all of the arguments, accusations and debates, I find this masterpiece of music will always endure in the end. It always does.