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don deal

La Cieca has just heard that as of this afternoon, La Scala has dismissed Giuseppe Filianoti from their opening night new production of Don Carlos (scheduled for a worldwide telecast Sunday) and replaced him for the entire run of performances with American tenor Stuart Neill.

Per La Cieca’s source, at the Thursday open dress rehearsal of the Verdi opera, Filianoti “wandered around incoherently” in the third act (i.e., the prison scene in the four-act version) and, again quoting our source “basically took a huge shit. He didn’t even know what opera he was in, apparently.”  La Cieca hears further that La Scala originally was going to remove Filianoti from only the first night or two of the opera, offering him dates later in the run, but the tenor turned them down.

Opera Chic also reports that La Scala’s management is trying to find a third tenor to take over some of the later performances (December 10, 12, 14, 16, 19, and 21 and January 4, 8, 11 and 15) in order to remove some of the pressure from Neill. Does Roberto Alagna know the part in Italian?

97 comments

  • T&I says:

    Dear La Cieca!

    Your reply only shows that you have no HUMAN INTEGRITY (as you did previously on many occasions, including a perfect disrespect in your post about the death of Sergey Larin who was a gay man, died because of it and deserved more RESPECT from you especially, if you claim yourself being so open about it; his wife cried about your post for days -- not all of your jokes are always funny). Opera houses are not gay bars and ability to write a review does not make you a critic. You cannot take a single line of criticism yourself always jumping the guns, maybe the press department should review their decisions to trash their former bosses and artist alla Fleming (you cannot grow up on this issue either and every single time you can to trash her on your blog (I don‘t like her either, but I do not go around and do the same as you on an almost monthly base), it is very predictable and lowered my opinion about you as a person in general. For some of these reasons the “carpenter” made you a persona non grata. Maybe he was not that wrong at all. Bravo Volpe on the 15th anniversary, hope we want have to wait for another one so long! Winnie the “Pooh-Pooh” for you!
    No other comment because you are not worth my time.

  • omerta discussa says:

    T@ whatever your name is, leave already. Place is too hot for your widdle sensitivities. BYE. Don’t let the door hit’ya where the good lord split ya.

    La Cieca is the doyenne here. off. Oh by the way, your not so accurate, Millo is the official cover for the Adrianna and if the truck cancels it is Millo who will sing. The other voice you mentioned is a second first cover like they did for the Gioconda because of Millo’s back. I personally hope that russian cow cancels and we get an authentic reading of Adrianna with Millo.

  • Atomic Wings says:

    To T&I

    What are you talking about? I have searched for a reference to Sergei Larin’s death on this website without success. Not to say it’s not here -- I just can’t find it.

    I find it hard to believe that La Cieca would have said something harsh about his death. It’s just not her style.

    In any case, yours is the first time I’ve seen his death related to his being gay, despite the rumors of AIDS, which were always denied. And people, both gay and straight, do sometimes die of other things than AIDS. Are you stating that he died of AIDS and, if so, why should we believe you?

    What could La Cieca say that would make her cry for days? He wss openly gay and involved with a man in a long-term relationship. Surely she must have known that; his scene with another man (his lover?) in Les Poussieres d’amour (Love’s Debris) was intensely erotic.

    And, as much as I admire Olivia Stapp, her Lady Macbeth was really bad.

  • Krunoslav says:

    89

    Sorry, I heard Olivia Stapp as Turandot at Torre del Lago (opposite Antonio Ordonez, Rosetta Pizzi and Paolo Washington, where are they now?) and though she gave an admirably thought-through acting performance, her singing was “quite adequate”-- which is saying something for Turandot, but does not add up to being “a legend”, nor-- unlike, say, Nilsson or Dimitrova-- is she remembered as such by any Italian opera critic or fan I have ever encountered.

    As I recall it from listening to the radio as a student, Miss Stapp’s SFO Donna Anna could be termed the stuff of legend in a very different sense.

    I am fond of this kind of professional but gutsy singer. Cynthia Lawrence-- assuredly less loony-toons than the Stapp of yore backstage-- is another such , and she gets short shrift too-- but let’s keep things in perspective.

  • La Cieca says:

    Atomic Wings: Larin’s death was mentioned more or less in passing here.

  • Atomic Wings says:

    Thank you both for that reference.

    In my opinion, it doesn’t seem disreapectful to Larin, unless one considers it disrespectful to refer to him as a gay tenor.

    Of course, his wife might feel otherwise, but I don’t think in that case anything La Cieca says is the real cause for her tears.