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Cher Public

  • Cicciabella: A big thank you to everyone who reported on Klinghoffer and reviewed the performance. This... 4:37 AM
  • Walther von Holzhaufen: Ivy, I just read your blog on Klinghoffer. I found your review and reflections to be... 4:33 AM
  • Often admonished: more http://leplus.nouv elobs.com/contribu tion/1251812-une-f emme-voilee-exp... 4:15 AM
  • Often admonished: Some kind of Intolerance Index considering all forms of censorship, artistic and aesthetic... 4:12 AM
  • tiger1: Dear Ms Ivy, Just read your review. Really really great. About giving the terrorists a back story,... 3:47 AM
  • Cicciabella: Nadja Michael is one hot 300-year old cougar in that trailer! I don’t know this opera very... 3:45 AM
  • tiger1: In my view, it is an error of the people who do not like DoK, who thinks it spends to much of an... 3:16 AM
  • Feldmarschallin: I had previously seen Behrens in 1988. It certainly is a diva role and she has by far the... 3:15 AM
  • tiger1: Actually, having now read the libretto and listened to the music, I think it is incorrectly to say... 3:12 AM
  • Buster: Thanks! I’ll definitely watch it next week. My Emilias thus far have been Catherine Malfitano,... 3:06 AM

get me pat racette!

The author, now viewed as an early feminist, based the plot on her own difficult experience with postpartum depression, which was then diagnosed as a nervous disorder curable only by a long period of bed rest, over-feeding and withdrawal from the world of family and friends. The character in the opera ends up going mad from this treatment, while confined to a room with peeling wallpaper.

You know how sometimes you read about a new opera and you think, boy, this has Francesca Zambello written all over it?

16 comments

  • harry says:

    Sorry, your name is Sanfordn ot Sandford…must remember!

  • Brad says:

    What surprises me about this is that an operatic version of “The Yellow Wallpaper” already exists. It was written in 1989 by Ronald Perera, a MA based composer. When I was in grad school in Chicago our opera department presented it. It has some catchy, vocally gracious lines, and provides a decent evening of theater. I found Alex’s above comment interesting, though, as he mentioned the “lasting value” of the show….since Perera’s version is all but forgotten, it makes one wonder if this new version will be any more memorable. Probably doesn’t hurt that a new film of the book is hitting theaters this year.

    Perhaps Famous Quickly could sing Charlotte in one version today and the other *tomorrow*. At least we’d have formidable vocal technique and dramatic fire even if the scores fall a bit short!

  • bardassa says:

    Marguerite in Faust/Mephistophele had postpartum depression too.

  • Sanford says:

    How about operas based on Jane Austen or one of the Bronte sisters. They may not be feminist, but they feature such wonderful female characters. And rather than Jane Eyre, I would pick Charlotte’s novel, “Villette”. Or maybe something by Harold Robbins. And certainly operas based on Gordin Merrick…ooh, starring all of our favorite hunkentenors and barihunks. Nathan Gunn and the future Mr. Netrebko starring in “An Idol For Others”!

  • erica says:

    Jane Austen and the Brontes are as feminist as they come! Great style. Great plots. Great women. Real art. (All right. Jane Eyre’s a castration fantasy, but at least she’s letting it all hang out.)

    And I love your idea of The Women as an opera. Don’t know what it says about me that I was chosen to play the writer (A virgin, a frozen asset) in our high school production. Well, maybe I do know what it says… but I still love the play.

  • Lydia Language says:

    I did rather enjoy Gilman’s story when I first read it (in a collected book of ghost stories), although I wondered how she could be writing it down (as she says she is) while she is crawling around the room and over the body of her fainting husband. But its status as a feminist icon is indeed rather off-putting. Manon Lescaut — now there’s a feminist icon for you! Why shouldn’t she have it all? Jewels? Madrigals? Hot sex? Convents? Louisiana vacations? Dare to dream, ML! Right on! (Has Zambello written all over it.)